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Former Louth TD Seamus Kirk received seventh largest pension pay out to ex-politicians last year

Former Louth TD Seamus Kirk received seventh largest pension pay out to ex-politicians last year

Former Louth TD Seamus Kirk the seventh largest pension pay out of any politician following his retirement last year.

The Fianna Fáil representative was a member of the Dáil from November 1982 until his retirement in February 2016. During that period he served as Minister of State for Horticulture from 1987 to 1992 and as Ceann Comhairle from 2009 to 2011.

The top beneficiaries nationally

According to figures produced by journalist Ken Foxe, the 72-year-old was one of 13 different politicians who received more than €200,000 last year.

In total Kirk received €220,627.34, according to the figures. This included a pension lump sum of €141,822.86, a termination lump sum of €14,748.53, termination payments of €33,184.20, a ministerial pension of €14,735.65 and basic pay of €16,136.10.

Another former local TD Dermot Ahern was 31st on the list having received €109,125.72 made up of his ministerial pension and basic pay.

Former local Senators Jim D’Arcy, Terry Brennan and Mary Moran also each received pay outs. The biggest beneficiary was Terry Brennan who received €50,532.35. Meanwhile, Mary Moran received €23,020.83 in total while Jim D’Arcy received €22,777.08.

The late Brendan McGahon, who died last February, also received basic pay of €48,021.12. Former local TDs Eddie Filgate, also since deceased, and Arthur Morgan both also received €22,312.44 and €21,943.80 respectively.

The late Brendan McGahon continued to receive payments last year

All together former local TDs and Senators received €518,360.68 last year.

In total the taxpayer paid out €19.67 million last year in pensions, lump sums and other retirement lump sums to former politicians.

Overall, the highest payment was made to Labour’s Emmett Stagg who received €247,231 after serving 29 consecutive years in the Dáil, as well as a spell as a minister.

Read the full article by Ken Foxe here.

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